Make your own kefir: everything you need to know

Milk and water kefir, resources for anyone thinking of making their own at home.

Kefir in a glass

Kefir resources to help you on the journey of fermentation

Why not make your own kefir, it’s good for you, cost effective and much simpler than you’d imagine. Kefir is really hot right now, it’s got a high visibility in the health and fermented food niche and shows signs that it could break out in the mainstream. I say this as a guy that never heard of kefir a few years ago, now I’m making my own at home. Although making kefir is pretty easy there are a few potential pitfalls, particularly to people new to fermentation, so I decided to share resources that I found useful.

For our own practical guide into home kefir production click here.

Keeping your kefir going, a practical video guide on how to keep the grains living whilst harvesting the product.

There is a BBC guide to the health benefits of kefir, it’s a little bit dated in approach, I guess you wouldn’t expect anything less from the BEEB.

Mad Millie Kefir Kit at Lakeland was our first experience of DIY kefir. The kit contains everything you need to get started and so is a useful first step for beginners. The Lakeland site also has a lot of items that fermenters might find useful including, Kilner jars, cheesecloth, wooden utensils.

A journal study exploring the microbial interactions in kefir, largely linked to the composition and health benefits of lactobacillus.

The Wikepedia kefir page is not the best DIY resource on the internet but it gives a good overview and links to a lot of the relevant research to anyone interested in the science.

The Cultures for Health guide to Kefir, useful information for new and experienced fermenters. Links to plenty of related articles including some water kefir insights.

For information on vegan kefir, visit the Nourished Kitchen website. All the ins and outs of  home productions, tips and recipes.

Simple homemade sauerkraut recipe

How to make simple sauerkraut, a traditional homemade fermentation recipe, suitable for beginners, inexpensive but very healthy.

cabbage
fermented cabbage for lifelong health and wellbeing

This a very simple recipe illustrating how easy it is to to make healthy fermented foods. Sauerkraut is a perfect starting point for your first fermentation project, it is quick, low cost and will provide plenty of gut friendly bacteria. Those little friends will work for you, supporting your immune and digestive systems, helping you to feel great physically and mentally. This is based on a traditional recipe from my family, quite literally passed on from mother to daughter for generations. If you are interested in a technical explanation of how fermentation and probiotics works, and what the evidence is for the health benefits, follow the link to resources at the foot of the page.

Ingredients:

  • around 1kg cabbage (finely sliced)
  • 1 medium carrot (grated)
  • salt (unprocessed, such as sea salt, do not use table or iodised) – proportion for cabbage to salt: 1kg of cabbage to 20 grams of salt
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 allspice berries

Preparation:

  1. make sure everything is perfectly clean, (the containers, utensils, work surfaces, chopping boards) as you want only good bacteria to grow
  2. take off first layer of leaves from your cabbage, also remove any damaged leaves
  3. finely cut or shred it
  4. grate the carrot
  5. mix it in a big bowl
  6. add salt and massage it in until cabbage starts release its juice then leave it for about 10 min
  7. you may wish to use a wooden vegetable stomper to squeeze more juice (different names for the same tool are pounder or tamper)
  8. put 1/3 of your mixture in a ceramic pot or you can use a glass jar, just make sure it is sterilised
  9. add 1 bay leave and 2 allspice berries
  10. add another 1/3 of the cabbage
  11. add 1 bay leave and 2 allspice berries
  12. squeeze it until brine covers all of the cabbage (it needs to stay submerged throughout the fermentation process)
  13. put the pot or jar on a plate just in case it spills out of the jar, the level will rise, if you use a glass jar don’t allow the product to make contact with a metal jar lid
  14. you can use a weight to keep the cabbage immerse or even a small (clean) plate
  15. Leave for 5-6 days and voila 😉

Remember:

Do not use a metal bowl or metal utensils as they will react with salt, sorry to be a bore but everything must be clean, any harmful bacteria you introduce may taint the product. Make your first batch small, then scale up. Remember with fermented vegetables you win in many ways you get the nutritional value of the ingredients plus the probiotic benefits.

Feedback:

Please leave feedback about this or your own fermented recipe in the comments section lower down the page.

Resources:

For the science behind fermentation visit the resources page, please see our disclaimer.