Could the glyphosate in your bread be harming you?

Could glyphosate in your bread be harming your health and gut microbiome? Time to switch to organic

Glyphosate in our bread
Is bread harming our health?

Bread is perhaps the oldest and most prominent of all man-made foods, it predates agriculture and there is evidence of its continuous use in some parts of the world for over 20,000 years. In essence, all you need to make bread is grains (flour) and a little water, the kneaded dough will rise (leaven) if left, because of the presence of naturally occurring sourdough microbes in the air.  Then all you have to do is bake, sounds simple, doesn’t it?

The problem is that to make a greater profit from bread production, some of the natural processes, used for tens of thousands of years, have to be modified. For example, greater mechanisation in bread production1 allows lower quality (lower protein) grains to be used, reducing the nutritional value of the bread we consume. Modern chemicals are also having an increasing role in our food production, including grain farming. The Government’s own figures show that the area treated with glyphosate in the UK increased by a quarter between 2014 – 20162.

So why the ‘glyphosate revolution’ in food production, what value does it add and what are the likely consequences to our health? Glyphosate is an active ingredient in some weedkillers, such as Roundup (developed by Monsanto). It is used on the soil to kill weeds before young plants emerge, and in the case of wheat, it is sprayed onto ripening crops to improve yields in a process called ‘drying’. We know that glyphosate is in the soil, the water, in our grain, in our bread and therefore in us3.

There was a time in our recent past when we generally believed in scientists and our government’s ability to regulate science for the common good. Health problems linked to human contact with glyphosate have been discussed for many years. In 2015 the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that the available evidence indicated glyphosate was ‘probably carcinogenic’ to humans4. Over a dozen countries have banned or limited the use of glyphosate, yet in many nations, it continues to be consumed by the wider population in different forms, despite evidence of its potential to harm.

So what’s all this got to do with Gut Well Soon? Unsurprisingly some organisations that make profits from the production, sale and use of glyphosate continue to maintain, that at the levels humans ingest the substance, there is no increased risk of developing cancer. However, courts are awarding billions of dollars in damages against Monsanto following claims that exposure to Roundup caused cancers5. There is also credible evidence that glyphosate has an impact on the microbiome, even at very low levels of ingestion. Meaning that our gut health may be declining because the food we eat has been tainted with chemicals.

So what can you do about this? There are suggestions that the explosion in wheat and gluten intolerance seen over the last 20 years, might be correlated with the increasing use of chemicals in grain production. No causal link has been proven but we do know that switching to sourdough bread has benefitted the health of a large number of people with digestive problems. It seems intuitive, that by eating bread with no traces of weedkillers our health (collectively) is likely to improve. This all inevitably leads us to a conversation about switching to organic, naturally produced bread including sourdough.

Notes

1 Chorleywood Bread Process
2 Soil Association
3 Concerns over use of glyphosate-based herbicides
4 IARC
5 The Guardian

The human microbiome; helping to prevent obesity, asthma and much more

Your diet can play a significant role in your chances of becoming obese, suffering from asthma or a range of other illnesses.

bbcdiscovery

Discovery, a general science programme from the BBC World Service, has put together a helpful three part guide to the human microbiome. It is made for the wider World Service audience so it presents the issues in an interesting but accessible way. The discussion of the subject matter is engaging, and important contributions are made by leading scientists in the field such as Prof Rob Knight, from the University of California and Prof Tim Spector from Kings.

The show provides a general outline broken down into three parts; Manipulating Our Hidden Half, Dirt and Development and Gateway to the Mind. The idea that humans (in common with other animals) have not one but two genomes is central to this mini series. Our human genome is the one handed down to us through our parents, set in stone at conception. The so called second genome is made up of a vast pool of genetic diversity present in the microbes found throughout and within our bodies. The Human Microbiome Project has begun the process of analyzing the large number of microbes present in us. Two key issues that have started to excite scientists in recent years are,

  • the extent to which microbes can influence human health and experience.
  • the ability of individuals to alter their own microbial profile.

For example, it is generally observed that increased diversity of different kinds of helpful bacteria in the gut, is correlated with improved wellness. Studies in obesity, allergies, asthma and auto immunity suggest that gut bacteria may have a crucial role in meditating our health. This opens up the prospect that lifestyles remedies such as changes to diet may offer us significant potential benefits. It also raises the question about the long term benefits of medication known to have a detrimental affect on gut bacteria such as antibiotics.

This then takes us back to the discussion of probiotic and prebiotic food and drinks. When you consume products rich in helpful bacteria (probiotics) or the soluble fibre known to support microbial diversity in the large intestine (prebiotics), you are likely to be improving your health in a number of ways. It cannot yet be said that there is a direct causal relationship between your diet and certain illnesses. However the scientists are starting to think of gut bacteria as increasing or decreasing the chances of suffering from particular health problems.

At the time of writing all three programmes were freely available online or to download here.