Health risks of bacon hits the headlines

Health risks of bacon and other processed meats hit the headlines.

Bacon and poor health
The relationship between bacon and poor health makes the news

I’ve been reading about the potential health risks linked to meat consumption for decades1. The evidence of a relationship between processed meat products in particular and serious illnesses including cancer has been established for many years. So recent and widespread calls to rid bacon and ham of nitrates comes as no surprise. In fact in some senses it feels like a long overdue and underwhelming response.

raw meat on brown wooden surface

Needless to say The British Meat Processors Association stand by their bacon and maintain that nitrates are ‘authorised additives’. However the dispute over the risks and benefits of nitrates in processed meat begs the question, why don’t we do away with processed meats altogether? Meats are processed to modify the taste or extend the shelf life, products include bacon, sausages, hot dogs, salami, corned beef, beef jerky, ham as well as canned meats. Until we know more about the relative health risks of the different products it might be advisable to avoid them all.

 

Notes

1 Relation of meat, fat, and fiber intake to the risk of colon cancer in a prospective study among women published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1990.

Header photo by Angele J on Pexels.com, meat photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com.

GWS 1 – How do we know if probiotics work?

How do we know if prebiotics work?

How do we know if prebiotics work?
How do we know if prebiotics work?

How do we know if probiotics work?

It feels like this latest study into the effectiveness of regular doses of an 11-strain probiotic cocktail might set the cat among the pigeons. If we are naturally resistant to new bacteria how can we evaluate the effect of probiotic rich foods and supplements?

 

 

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Apple cider vinegar: your daily tonic

Lose weight, boost immunity, clear colds, increase stomach acid, feel great – Apple cider vinegar.

close up of fruits hanging on tree
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Here in the county of Kent, the local fermentation community have been buzzing about apple cider vinegar for some time. Kent is a ‘garden county’, it has a long standing tradition of growing fruit, in particular apples, pears, cherries and soft fruits, not to mentions hops. In fact Brogdale houses one of the UK’s largest collection of apple trees with some 2,200 different varieties on one site.

We’ve used organic apple cider vinegar regularly over the last year, it’s got a number of culinary applications but in our home its main role is as a homely remedy.  In the media you will copexels-photo-413990.jpegme across a number of claims for its health benefits including, treatment of cold symptoms, regulation of blood sugar, support for a healthy gut, an immunity booster and even a mediator of  weight loss. Although I have seen little evidence that apple cider vinegar directly causes consumers to shed pounds, its reputation as a tonic goes from strength to strength.

My own personal use of apple cider vinegar was linked to a misdiagnosis of acid reflux. It turned out that my stomach acid levels were too low not too high or escaping.  To restore the balance I took 1 tablespoon of the vinegar diluted in a small amount of water before meals. It gradually did the trick, after about ten days all the signs of acid reflux had gone, however I still take a shot of the vinegar a couple of times a week. Incidentally I have been told that acid reflux can manifest similar symptoms to low levels of stomach acid, so the two are often confused. One way to tell the difference is to look for signs of undigested food in your stools. This is normally a good indicator that what you eat isn’t being broken down fully in the stomach and can be caused by low levels of stomach acid.

As a home fermenter I was particularly interested in accounts of how to make apple food-healthy-vegetables-potatoes.jpgcider vinegar for myself. It is definitely a little more complicated than the products I’m currently working with (soya and orange kefir, red and white cabbage, ginger) but I’m keen to give it a try.  In September we can normally expect the quality and quantity of local organic apples to be at their peak, that’s when I plan to start my first batch. I’m advised that it can take anything up to 12 weeks to create. If anyone out there has some experience I’d welcome more tips or first hand accounts.