Menopause and health, diet is crucial

Diet is becoming a crucial factor in maintaining estrogen levels in post menopausal women.

Menopause and health, diet is crucial
Post menopause health is linked to gut health

Menopause and health, diet is crucial

The number of women living with the menopause is growing, therefore more people are at risks from illnesses connected with life after the menopause. A recent study investigating estrogen levels and gut health in post menopausal females found a relationship between microbial diversity¬† (the different types of microbes) and circulating estrogen. The implications of this are huge because low estrogen is linked to a wide range of health issues. Typically the diversity of microbes in the human digestive system (gut microbiota) can be altered with changes to diet, for example a greater emphasis on plant based foods, and the use of probiotics and prebiotics. This suggests that women’s health generally, including fertility might be improved simply through alterations to diet.

One of the most important factors in the amount of circulating estrogens in women is the gut microbiome (the population of microbes in our gut). The greater the diversity of gut bacteria generally speaking the higher the levels of estrogen will be. Low levels of estrogen are associated with a wide range of illnesses in older women such as: obesity, cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome, heart disease and even cognitive function. It is suggested that bariatric surgery, fmt and medication (metformin) can alter the gut microbiome and therefore limit estrogen-driven disease. But the evidence suggests that changes to diet alone may be able to have a significant impact on estrogen levels

I’d like to highlight four of the issues raised by the research:

  • There appears to be a strong relationship between what women eat and levels of circulating estrogen.
  • Different treatments exist to increase estrogen, but dietary changes alone might deliver significant benefits.
  • The benefits of increased circulating estrogen through improved diet may be available to women of any age and might be linked to improved fertility.
  • This study reflects a general pattern in health seen in human microbiome research, that a healthy gut is linked to reduced risks of developing a wide range of illnesses.

 

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