Parkinson’s disease linked to the gut

Evidence suggests the causes for Parkinson’s disease may originate in the gut.

Parkinson's disease may start in the gut
Parkinson’s disease may start in the gut

The Guardian1 ran a story yesterday, pulling together some of the latest evidence linking the origins of Parkinson’s disease to the gut. It has long been thought that when a protein called alpha-synuclein is misfolded and clumps together in the brain, it is associated with nerve damage and a reduction in dopamine. This, in turn, is presumed to be responsible for the deterioration in the control of speech and movement, two of the key symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. But recent research in this field has been looking at the gut as a potential point of origin for the misfolded alpha-synuclein.

clinic doctor health hospital

The direct two-way channel between the gut and brain (the gut-brain axis) is being seen as an increasingly important mediator of human health.  A recent study with mice has added weight to the hypothesis that the misfolded alpha-synuclein originates in the intestinal tract and use the vagus nerve to travel to the brain. This follows earlier findings that indicate having your appendix removed reduces the chances of developing Parkinson’s in later life. Taken together these studies signpost the possibility that prevention of  Parkinson’s disease could focus on the gut rather than the brain.

However, there are a number of further steps that need to be made, not least a convincing explanation of what causes the misfolding of alpha-synuclein in the gut. As such, it is premature to conclude that the primary cause of Parkinson’s disease originates in the digestive tract. But this latest evidence underpins the importance of the gut in human health more generally. Understanding how to maintain a healthy gut microbiome through the use of prebiotics and probiotics is entering the mainstream. In addition, science is also drawing our attention to the pressing need to avoid substances that degrade or limit gut health, such as the chemicals that are present in a wide range of foodstuffs.

 

Notes

1 https://www.theguardian.com

Author: eatscientifically

As a researcher working with the contemplative sciences, it became evident to me that food plays an important role in the life of most regular meditators. From this realisation, it was only a small step to identify correlations between diet and certain cognitive characteristics linked to meditation and mindfulness. Over the last decade, science has been increasingly supporting the view that our diet meditates our gut bacteria, which in turn directly correlates with our physical and mental health. Central to this understanding is the appreciation that some simple and inexpensive fermented foods and drinks make a positive contribution to gut health. Science now supports the proposition that improving your gut health is likely to increase your resilience to a number of illnesses including some forms of cancer, heart disease, depression and anxiety.

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