Autism correlated with gut health

Autism correlated with guthealth. More evidence links gut bacteria to developmental disorders.

Our gut bacteria may play a role in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
Our gut bacteria may play a role in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

There is mounting evidence of a relationship between the microbiome and autism. Taken in isolation one study that challenges conventional thinking about any condition such as autism should be treated with suspicion. However, increasing scientific research into gut health and wellbeing is starting to shift the thinking about human health in a completely new direction.

A number of studies have observed abnormal gut microbiota correlated with a range of conditions including autism. However, the issue of causality is still uncertain. So what does this mean?  In short that the bacteria in the human gut demonstrates a different profile in people with autism than people without autism. The scientific term for a balance and blend of gut bacteria that fall outside of the ‘normal’ range is known as dysbiosis. Exactly how gut dysbiosis is linked to autism is still far from clear. There is the possibility that dysbiosis is the effect of a condition rather than the cause of it, although we know there is a two-way relationship between the gut and the brain through the gut-brain access.

A recent overview of research into gut microbiota and dysbiosis in autism found that gut microbiota probably has a mediating role in ASD. By logical deduction, we can be confident that diet at some level is likely to be connected to the development of ASD or the maintenance of its symptoms.

So while we are waiting for science to deliver ‘conclusive’ findings that will help us understand more about autism, what shall we do?

Clearly, we should attempt to establish a healthy gut. The list of health problems linked to dysbiosis grows almost every day, they currently include a range of cancers, heart disease and even dementia! Amongst the simple measures every person can engage with immediately to keep a healthy gut, are to avoid processed meats and eat more fermented foods.

It’s far too early to draw firm conclusions about diet and complex developmental conditions such as ASD. But a picture is starting to emerge were just as diet influences gut health, gut health influences physical and mental wellbeing, there was never a greater case for embracing the maxim ‘we are what we eat’.

Author: eatscientifically

As a researcher working with the contemplative sciences, the key role that food has in health and wellbeing became evident to me. From there it was a small step to realize that fermentation and gut bacteria play an essential part in our lives. Do yourself and your loved ones a favour, check out the evidence linking gut bacteria and health now!

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